Half Marathon Pace Teams by the Dallas Running Club

The MetroPCS Dallas White Rock Marathon Presented by Nexbank is honored to feature Dallas Running Club Pace Teams as part of the half marathon race. The Dallas Running Club Pace Teams promise to provide fun and excitement for both first time and experienced half marathoners looking to reach their running goals – whether that’s a personal best or just getting across the finish line.

Pace Teams
Pace Teams

Half Marathon pace team goal times: 1:40, 1:50, 2:00, 2:10, 2:20, 2:30.

Important Chip Instructions

Chip Technology

The events will be timed using Champion Chip chip technology. A “chip” is is a miniature transponder in a specially designed plastic housing. It is attached to the runner’s shoelace and contains data that identifies each runner individually. The chip allows us to register your time when you cross mats that recognize your chip and record information.

Pick Up and Test Your Chip at the Expo

You will need to pick up your chip at packet pickup during the Marathon Fitness Expo. There is no chip pickup on race day. Be sure your chip works by testing it after you pick it up. There will be a special table-top mat set up at the Expo over which you can pass your chip to make sure it is recognized and that it is assigned to you. Times CAN NOT be adjusted after the race due to chip error, so it is imperative that you test your chip at the Expo.

Important Chip Instructions

Timing Requirements

Your time will be recorded as you pass a start mat, finish mat, halfway mat and two other mats at undisclosed locations (relay runners see special instructions below). All award winners must have a time recorded at all five mat locations. Age group award times will be based on your chip time. The only exception is that the top ten overall male and female will be determined by clock time. After the race, volunteers will remove the chip from your shoe before you leave the exit chute area. Runners not returning their chips at the finish line will be assessed a $30 fee.

Relay Team Chip Instructions

The chip should be worn by the person running the last leg of the relay, in other words, the team member that crosses the finish line. Your chip time will only be registered at the finish line. After the race, volunteers will remove the chip from your shoe before you leave the exit chute area. Failure to turn in the timing chip disqualifies your team and results in a $30.00 charge.

Mayor’s Race 5K Presented by Cigna

Mayor’s Race Results

Click here for results of the Mayor’s Race 5K Presented by Cigna. Congratulations to all of our runners!

2011 Mayor’s Race 5K Presented by Cigna

The 2011 Mayor’s Race 5K Run/Walk and 1 Mile Kids Run Presented by Cigna is part of the race weekend festivities surrounding the 42nd running of the Dallas White Rock Marathon. The 5K (3.1 mile) event is for serious runners looking for a non-competitive late-year 5K race, casual athletes looking for an interesting walking tour of Fair Park, or families seeking to get involved in all the Weekend activities.   For kids who would find a 5K too much of a challenge, there is also a 1 Mile Kids event. This year’s Mayor’s Race is expected to be the best ever — the 5K course has been improved, making it potentially one of the fastest 5K courses in Dallas. The Mayor’s Race, launched nine years ago by then-Mayor Laura Miller as a way to encourage school kids to become more physically active, has blossomed into an ideal warm-up event for marathon participants and their families. All Mayor’s Race participants will receive a Mayor’s Race T-shirt.  If available, additional t-shirts can be purchased for $10.

Date: Saturday, December 3, 2011
Location: Dallas Fair Park, adjacent to the Automobile Building
Parking: Free parking on Fair Park grounds for Mayor’s Race participants.
Online Registration: Open now, until 11/25/2011. Online registrants can pick up their packets at the Mayor’s Race booth inside the Expo on Friday.
Online Registration Cost: $10 for registered Marathon, Half Marathon and Marathon Relay participants who register online before 11/25/2011. All other registrants, $15 before 8/31/2011; $20 from 9/1/2011 – 11/25/2011. Only those participants who register online for the 5K will be chip-timed.
Expo Registration Friday, 12/2/11: $25 all participants. Chip-timing available upon request. Expo Registration begins at 11:00 at the Mayor’s Race booth in the Automobile Building. You’ll be able to pick up your packet when you register.
Race Day Registration Saturday: $25 for all participants. No chip-timing available on Race Day. Race Day registration begins at 7:00 am at Start Line.
DISD Registration: No cost for DISD students and teachers who register at their schools during the month of October. No chip-timing is available for DISD participants who register for free.

Former Dallas Mayor Laura Miller and 2010 race participant Cameron Keysor

Mayor’s Race Schedule

7:00 a.m. Race day registration, pre-race activities and live music begin at the starting line adjacent to the Automobile Building at Fair Park
9:00 a.m. Mayor’s Race 5K Presented by Cigna begins
9:10 a.m. 1 Mile Kids Run begins
10:00 a.m. Check out the Health & Fitness Expo in the Automobile Building! Visit more than 100 health and fitness booths and the Kid’s Fit and Fun Pavilion.

PLEASE NOTE: NO DOGS WILL BE PERMITTED ON THE RACE COURSE.To keep everyone safe, please leave Fido or Fluffy at home.

Ready to start training for the Mayor’s Race 5K? Check out our 3 Months to 3 Miles Training Program. Have any questions about the Mayor’s Race 5K?

Email mayorsrace@runtherock.comwith questions.

Thank you to our sponsors

                  

 

Mayor’s Race Partners

     

Marathon and Half Marathon Course Information

Overview

The marathon and half marathon are single-loop courses that begin and end at the American Airlines Center. Race time will be called out or a clock will be located at each mile marker. There will be 21 aid stations along the course.

Course Time Limit: 7.5 Hours

What does a 7.5-hour marathon course limit mean? The marathon course is open and closed on a “rolling” schedule similar to a parade, with the start line opening to runners at 8:00 a.m. and finish line closing to runners at 3:30 p.m. If participants choose to continue running after 3:30 p.m., they do so at their own risk and will be required by the Dallas Police Department to move to available sidewalks and obey traffic signals along the course. No times will be recorded after 3:30 p.m.

Commencing shortly after the race begins, race equipment trucks, accompanied by the Dallas Police Department, depart from the start line and travel the marathon course at 17-minute per-mile pace, picking up course equipment as they proceed. As the trucks pass over the course, the police close the course to runners and reopen it to ordinary traffic. Under no circumstances may participants be on the marathon course before the official start time. Starting before the official start will result in disqualification.

Finisher medallions and completion certificates will be awarded only to those who finish within the official time span. Medical Aid closes at 3:30 p.m. in the American Airlines Center lobby. If problems are experienced after this time, please contact your personal physician or proceed to the nearest emergency room.

Special Rules of the Course

In accordance with the guidelines issued by USA Track & Field and Wheelchair Sports USA, only runners and wheelchairs will be allowed on the course. The term “wheelchair,” as defined for this event, means push-rim wheelchairs only. In addition, guidelines for wheelchair participants state that all chairs must be equipped with brakes and wheelchair competitors must wear helmets.

The following are prohibited on the course: runners going backwards, jump ropes, animals, bicycles, baby strollers, baby joggers, roller skates, in-line skates, skateboards and headset devices. No wheeled vehicles are allowed other than wheelchairs. No exceptions. Please do not use cell phones during the race, as these can be hazardous.

In areas, only the side of the road runners are on will be closed to vehicular traffic. As such, it is imperative that you stay within the cones marking the course. Any deviations from the marked race course can result in a disqualification!

It is our intent to provide the safest possible race course. Those who participate in violation of these rules will be disqualified and removed from the course.

Foot runners and authorized vehicles have the right-of-way at all times. Wheelchair participants must yield the right-of-way to foot runners and to course vehicles.

Any assistance received from anyone other than an official aid station volunteer or other course official may result in a disqualification.

Metropcs Dallas White Rock Marathon

Full Marathon Distance – 26.2 miles Sunday, December 4, 2011 • 8:00 a.m. Fair Park, Dallas, Texas

The course begins and ends in Fair Park near the north end of the Cotton Bowl and runs to and around scenic White Rock Lake, with so much course entertainment that you might forget you’re running a marathon! The 26.2-mile certified course is mostly flat with some rolling hills. Along the way, runners pass through the Downtown Dallas Arts District, through the hip Uptown area, along majestic Turtle Creek, through prestigious Highland Park, around White Rock Lake, through beautiful Lakewood and down the Swiss Avenue historical district back to the finish within Fair Park.

Fair Park Information

Why did race organizers decide to move from Victory Park to Fair Park for the 2010 race?

The Dallas White Rock Marathon has grown steadily over the last 40 years, and during that time, we’ve occasionally had to move to new locations to meet the growing number of race participants. For the last few years, our marathon has sold out earlier and earlier, and our waiting list has grown longer and longer.

After the 2009 race, the Board of Trustees met and decided after careful consideration to find a new location that would provide ample parking for participants, plenty of open space for expanded runner amenities, like the food tent and family meeting areas, and a larger area to help ease congestion at the start and finish line.

Why Fair Park?

Fair Park provides marathon participants with expanded parking options (including free parking on race day until 8AM), a larger start and finish location, and plenty of open space to accommodate the infrastructure necessary for a 22,000 participant race.

Fair Park is also one of the most historically significant parts of Dallas. The 30-structure complex constitutes the largest intact concentration of 1930s-era exposition buildings and public art remaining in the United States. It is also recognized as one of the most significant sites in the world for Art Deco architecture.

Today, Fair Park is a 277-acre venue containing one of the largest complexes of year-round cultural, entertainment, exhibit and sports facilities in the U.S. Southwest, including the recently renovated Esplanade Bellagio-style fountains, and museums such as the Women’s Museum and the Museum of Nature and Science.

How much will the move impact the full and half marathon courses?

We’re working with the city of Dallas to build our best full and half courses yet. The Dallas White Rock Marathon has always been a race built by runners for runners, so making sure that we’re constantly improving the runner experience in our marathon, half marathon and relay is a top priority. Both the half and full marathon courses will remain uniquely DWRM courses; they will not be replicas of other race courses that start and/or finish at Fair Park.

The full marathon course will not be drastically changed; rather it will be tweaked and improved over the course from Victory Park. It will still run through historic Dallas neighborhoods like Swiss Avenue, through beautiful tree lined areas in East Dallas, Highland Park and along Turtle Creek, and of course, will curve around White Rock Lake.

We’re very excited about the new half marathon course, which we believe will be the DWRM’s best half marathon course yet and will combine the best features of many popular Dallas races from the past and the present. We will release course details as soon as possible.

History of Fair Park

Site of the 1936 Texas Centennial Exposition, Fair Park boasts the world’s largest collection of Art Deco exhibit buildings, art and sculpture.

Before television – and long before the Internet – World Fairs were a means of introducing the public to new products, new technology and far away places.

In 1936, Texas celebrated the 100th anniversary of the Texas Republic with a world’s fair in Dallas. Texas’ history, economy, flora and fauna were portrayed in the building, statues and murals designed for the event – all constructed in Art Deco style.

Fair Park is the only intact and unaltered pre-1950s world fair site remaining in the United States – with an extraordinary collection of 1930s art and architecture.

Today, the 277-acre park and its cultural, educational and sports facilities play host to more than seven million annual visitors.

Health and Fitness Expo

An Expanded Two-Day Expo – Shop, Learn and Enjoy!

Before you Run the Rock, SHOP the Health & Fitness Expo! If you are looking for one of the largest gathering of sports fitness experts, nutrition and training products, and running enthusiasts in the Southwest, join us at the Health & Fitness Expo. With over 85 vendors and more than 60,000 people expected to attend, the Expo has something for everyone! Admission is free and open to the community!

Date/Time:

Friday, December 3, 2010 – 12:00 – 6:00 p.m.
Saturday, December 4, 2010 – 9:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Location:

Automotive Building – Fair Park
1010 First Avenue, Dallas, TX 75315

Health and Fitness Expo

Parking:

If you are driving to the expo, please note that the City of Dallas charges $10 per car for parking in Fair Park. The DART Green Line stops at Fair Park Station, within yards of the Automotive Building. More info on DART’s Green Line can be found on their website.

For Hyatt Guests:

A shuttle bus will be available to transport guests to and from the Expo from the marathon host hotel –the Hyatt Regency Dallas beginning at 8:30 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. on Saturday.  Buses will also transport runners to and from Fair Park on race day from 6:30 a.m. until 2:30 p.m.

Light Rail:

Dallas Area Rapid Transit rail schedules available on the DART website.

Recycling at the Expo

Clif Bar and Co. is proud to be the official recycling partner of the MetroPCS Dallas White Rock Marathon. We aim to reduce the environmental foot print at the Dallas White Rock Marathon by recycling as much waste as possible. You can help the environment by using the recycling bins positioned throughout the Expo.

Packet Pickup at Expo Required
There is ABSOLUTELY NO Race-Day Packet Pickup!

There is no packet pickup or registration on race day. All packets must be picked up at the Expo. Packets will not be mailed to participants. Late registration for the marathon only will also be available at the Expo.

Expo Exhibitors

2010 U.S. Census Inwood Chiropractic
3M Half Marathon & Relay iRUNLIKEAGIRL
AAA Texas KT Tape
Active.com Lane Four Swim Shop
Advocare Larabar Cascadian Farm
Alimtox Lasting Commemoratives
American Laser Centers Lifespeed Sports
America’s Run Little Rock Marathon
Anthony Travel Inc. Lone Star Relays
Athletes Honey Milk Luke’s Locker
Austin Marathon Marathon Charms
Bandeau-Ni the all-sport headband! Max Muscle Sports Nutrition
Bath Fitter Mellew Productions
Baylor Heart & Vascular Hospital Metro PCS
Baylor Sportscare MGD64
BeeCause Charms Monroe Products
Bondi Band National Running Center
Broadview Security – Nature’s Best
The Next Generation of Brink’s Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon
Home Security Polar Electro, Inc.
Cabot Creamery Cooperative Power Balance
Celsius Precision Sport Eyewear
Chevron Houston Marathon Road Runners Club of America (RRCA)
ChicaBands.com Rock Shop
CK SPORTS Route 66 Marathon
Clif Bar & Co. Run On!
Community Coffee Selkin Laser Center
Competitor Group Sensational Sheets
Culligan Seven+
Dallas Convention & Visitors Bureau Sewell Automotive Companies
Dallas Running Club Snickers Marathon Bar
DART SOMA by Seiko
Dick Beardsley Foundation Southern Journeys
EFX SPIbelt
Elektroplate Sport Hooks & More
Enlyten Sports Central Supply
Evolv Health Spring Valley Wellness
Exercise Express Susan G. Komen for the Cure
Fitfindr.com Team In Training
Fit For Sport Team Nuts
Fond Memories Graphics, Inc. Team World Vision
Gecco Marketing Texas Center for Foot and Ankle
Surgery
GG Quad Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children
Good Gear The Cowtown
Green Mountain Enegy The Shoe Bank
Gypsy Runner TheStick.com/RPI of Atlanta
Heels and Hills University of Phoenix
High Beam Promotions UT Southwestern – Sports Medicine
Hold On Girls! Vega by Sequel Naturals
Hughlett Chiropractic Vitalsox
iFitness yurtopia: yurbuds earbud enhancers
Inside Texas Running Your Eyes

Events

26.2 Miles of Rock, Funk, Country, Soul and More!

From an incredible runners’ send-off to more than 40 flavors of entertainment lining the entire course, the MetroPCS Dallas White Rock Marathon will provide continuous hooplah for both runners and spectators alike.

From the moment the runners line up to get ready for the race, the excitement begins. Live music at the starting will keep you energized while you await the starting gun and a military fighter jet flyover. With fireworks and confetti rounding out the race’s tremendous kick-start, you’ll be on your way to 26.2 miles of rock, funk, country, soul, hip-hop and pop.

After the race ends, the entertainment continues with the Post-Race Party that features live music on stage for the resting and weary. Here is a listing of our 2009 course entertainment:

2009 Marathon Course Entertainment

Mile Address Band
1 Ross @ St.Paul 1st United Methodist Church Carillion Ringers
3 McKinney @ Allen Gird Your Loins
3 McKinney @ Hall Tom Kellner a/k/a Zom
4 Turtle Creek @ Fitzhugh Luke’s Locker
6 McCommas @ Central Director’s Staff Shrine Band
6 5436 Longview Second Hand Noise
7 Granada Theatre – 3524 Greenville Hot House
7 5715 Ellsworth All Talk
7 5835 Ellsworth Shortwave Audio
8 6148 Ellsworth Alpha Dogs
8 6460 Ellsworth School of Rock
9 3923 Frontier The Big Guns
10 Tee Pee Hill Charli Alexander Jam
12 NW Hwy/W. Lawther The NeverRest Band
14 Big Thicket KUMAASI African Ensemble
15 Bath House Drums Not Guns
16 Sunset Bay Bedrock
17 E. Lawther @ Arboretum The Smeetones
18 7-Eleven – E. Lawther @ Winstead Jimmy Barcus
19 Winstead @ Loving Hooters & DH Sports Anchor Rose
20 7030 Lakewood Sad Design
21 6252 Richmond Guitars4Cadillacs
22 Savage Park Trinity Dogs
23 4726 Swiss CatDaddles
23 4726 Swiss When Squirrels Attack
23 3434 Swiss Tonti Properties
24 2600 Live Oak Hi-Lifers: Romantic Retro Lounge
25 San Jacinto @ Griffin Finish Strong Dallas
26 Dick’s Last Resort Neighborhood Nuisance
26.2 FINISH LINE DoctorDoctor
26.2 FINISH LINE The Lupners
Inside the AAC PitPops

Half Marathon Course Entertainment

Mile Address Band
Half Matilda @ Goodwin Maine Corp Recruiting
Half Knox & Katy Trail Phoenix
Half Cedar Springs & Katy Trail The Bad Monkeys

Mayor’s Race Entertainment

Mile Address Band
Start City Hall Rockupational Therapy
Start City Hall Beckley Ave.
Young @ Market Greenville Avenue Pre-Teen Chorus

Pasta Party Entertainment

Hyatt Regency Dallas Shelley Laine & The Random Act Band

Map Language: Proposed, Submitted, Pending or Officials

Much has been discussed regarding the status of the course maps for the 2010 MetroPCS Dallas White Rock Marathon and Half Marathon.  A little history – the planning for an eventual move from Victory Park began a couple of years ago as we saw a dramatic rise in participant numbers and heard stories from frustrated runners and spectators regarding the amount of time spent in lines for parking, the shortage of parking, the inability to easily circumnavigate around the finish line corral, the lack of additional attractions, and other concerns.  The  race prospered at Victory Park and the American Airlines Center, and as a result the reputation of the Dallas White Rock Marathon as a first-class race continued to grow.  But with that success came problems that would eventually need to be addressed one way or another.

We began searching for viable alternative courses prior to the start of the 2009 race. After the 2009 race the alternatives and their impact on the race were researched, discussed and voted on. Although the Board of Directors made the final decision, many outside parties contributed to the search process, including the City of Dallas, the DPD, Fair Park officials, and runners themselves.

MetroPCS Dallas

Once the decision was made the process of filing for and working towards approval of the course began. There are several different agencies that approve the course, some of them city departments and some outside third parties. With approximately 1.3 million people, the City has to consider the rights of all citizens and the impact a race as large and long as the marathon has on its citizens. Likewise, the organizers take into consideration not only what is best for the runners, but also the impact on residents and businesses along the route.

Decisions made on this basis are not made overnight. It’s not as simple as opening a map, drawing a line 26.2 miles long on it, and declaring it the official course. We take into consideration the conditions along the course that come into play during a road race:  the type and condition of the road surface, width of the road, level or curved, high curbs or no curbs, surrounding land uses, traffic patterns, aesthetics, and the list goes on.  What we think makes a good course may not be the same conclusion as others. So we all work together to find the best compromise between all parties involved. This doesn’t happen at a single meeting where everyone gets together and hashes it out before we can go home.  Paperwork is filled out, different departments review different aspects of the proposed course, provide feedback, revisions are made, the proposal goes back out, etc. Once we have enough feedback, the course route is submitted for final review. At that point it is pending as it goes through a last round of formal reviews. At this level new eyes look at it and provide feedback. During this process all parties involved have been very supportive. We are fortunate that many of the people involved in this decision making process are also runners and want to make this the best race possible.

So when does the map become “Official”? Once it has been officially approved by all parties involved.  But wait – at some point we want to get the course certified by USA Track & Field so the course can serve as a Boston-qualifier and the runners can rest assured that they are on an accurately measured 26.2 mile course. If we do that too early in the process and then have to make changes later we may have to start the measurement and certification process all over. That alone is a time consuming and expensive proposition.  So we wait until we feel fairly confident that there won’t be any more significant changes to the course.  If we measure the course and find it’s either short or long and have to make an adjustment, then we go back to either the proposed course or submitted course stage.

With the move to Fair Park we are addressing several problems we experienced at Victory Park. While we loved having our event there, Fair Park offers new opportunities to improve the overall event. The courses are flatter (removed a couple of hills), have less turns (cut the number of turns through Highland Park alone by 60%) and as a result are faster. As runners that all sounds good to us. There’s more parking at Fair Park, more open areas, the museums will be open for free during the day on Saturday and Sunday, state fair type food vendors will be out selling their deep-fried treats, and other activities. Fair Park is truly a gem within the City of Dallas and should be appreciated by all who visit it.

So when will we announce the maps are Official?  Plenty of time before the race that you will be able to look at every manhole cover along the route. Although this may not please all, the timing is very similar to what we went through when we moved from White Rock Lake to City Hall, and then again from City Hall to Victory Park. Using the same course year after year speeds the approval process up dramatically and makes our jobs that much easier. But the goal of the organizers is to make this the best race possible and changes were needed. Talk to veterans about our previous races and then give us a chance to show you our improvements.

5 Months to 5 Miles Relay Training Program

Created by the Cooper Fitness Center

Relay Training Plan Basics
Weeks 1-4: Preparatory Phase
Weeks 5-8: Endurance Phase
Weeks 9-12: Endurance/Strength Phase
Weeks 13-16: Strength Phase
Weeks 17-20: Sharpening & Tapering Phase

The world-renowned Cooper Aerobics Center has created a unique training program called “5 Months to 5 Miles” to help five-person teams prepare for the 5-Person Relay or the SMU Cox Corporate Relay Challenge Presented by Behringer Harvard.

“5 Months to 5 Miles” is a progressive month-by-month regimen that is flexible enough to accommodate the schedule of the busiest corporate professional.

Training Plan Basics

The 20 week plan begins July 18, 2011; however, participants can begin any time. The plan is appropriate for three levels: non-runners (B=Basic); runners currently able to run 2 to 3 times per week up to 30 minutes (I=Intermediate); or those consistently running four to five times a week, up to one hour per run (A=Advanced); or for those who wish to follow a structured plan.

Relay Training

The plan includes optional runs or cross training: a fourth run for Intermediate or fifth run for Advanced; and alternative cross training for all levels. This plan requires that each run count. Total time duration listed includes a very easy 3-5 minute warm-up and cool-down. For Intermediate and Advanced, aim to separate higher-intensity efforts with a rest or recovery day, or a cross training day (for example between Tuesday and Thursday) and the long run. Bottom Line: make the training plan fit your schedule and adjust the days as needed!

The cardinal rule for a new runner, or someone returning to exercise: be patient. You’re brimming with enthusiasm and looking for tips. Your body needs time to adapt. Activity may be uncomfortable at first, but you’ll begin to see results. It’s important to build gradually.

  • Run more slowly than you think you should, and insert walk segments.
  • The first 3-4 weeks don’t run as far as you think you should.
  • Run more often than you think you should, or have time for, but short distances.

Weeks 1-4: Preparatory Phase

If you are following the full 5 Months to 5 Miles plan, the following section begins July 18, 2011; however participants can start the program at any time.

Training Pace

To be sure you’re running at the desired pace is to use a heart rate monitor, but many simply learn how their bodies feel at certain paces. The following information describes the approximate percentage of max heart rate, or the “feel” of each type of the various factors at a given pace.

Easy: Easy occurs about 60-72% of your maximal heart rate (MHR). It is a good recovery pace between faster workout days, and is a “normal” aerobic training pace. When this “talk” pace is held for longer runs, it’s a useful way to rely more on fat for energy. The long runs are about putting in time on the body than pushing intensity. They help you become accustomed to fluid loss and other stresses. Easy pace is where all training begins—and should remain several weeks before introducing faster running or walking. Focus on light foot turnover and rhythmic breathing.

Threshold: About 80-85% of MHR and provides quality training with limited stress. For many, it’s slower than 5K pace by about 20-30 seconds per mile. As “tempo runs,” they should feel comfortably moderate, or moderate to hard for more Advanced runners. Threshold pace can be also be used for hill repetitions or intervals. This pace can help improve the ability to clear lactic acid waste from the blood. Avoid training in this intensity more than one to two times per week.

Interval: This is an uncomfortable or a hard effort over short distances, about 85 to 90 or to 98% of MHR for brief periods and should not be longer than 3 to 5 minutes. Intervals can help train the body through prolonged periods at a high effort. Pace should approximate effort you could not keep up longer than 15 minutes. This is not all-out running. Faster than this pace will cause fatigue and high risk for injury, plus compromise your next training day.

Repetition: Faster than interval pace, these very hard efforts are used to get your body moving smoothly at a fast pace. Racing requires running economy and speed. This pace can help improve the mechanical aspect of training to replicate race-day. These should be limited, and attempted by advanced or more experienced runners, and require full recovery between each repetition so that each one is completed at the same pace.

Each pace helps ensure a safe training regimen over the next 20+ weeks in the most efficient way. Basic runners: just put in the time at an easy to moderate foundation pace! Intermediate and Advanced runners: Long and foundation runs should be about 50-75% of total weekly mileage, threshold runs about 6-8%, intervals around 5-6% and repetition pace roughly 5%.

Every fourth week is recovery! Reduced training allows the body to adapt and prepare for coming weeks. 5K tune-up races will be included in the schedule. If you can’t find a 5K on those weeks, run a 1.5 to 3 mile time trial instead.

Weeks 5-8: Endurance Phase

If you are following the full 5 Months to 5 Miles plan, the following section begins August 16, 2010; however participants can start the program at any time.

Weeks 5-8 of our relay team training plan are presented below as we continue to build aerobic endurance foundation for all three levels of runners. The runs in this block are still primarily easy, low-effort or moderately-low effort endurance runs. Basic (novice) runners can continue the walk/run routine or try longer jogging segments between short walk segments. The endurance phase is the longest and most important essential building block for every runner, as it conditions the cardiorespiratory system, muscles and emotions, especially for those getting back into the habit of regular exercise after a layoff. Don’t sabotage your success by trying to run too fast too soon. If you are just now forming your team, or joining the relay training program, with 16 weeks of preparation before race date there’s still plenty of time! Select the level most appropriate for your fitness level, and lace up your shoes.

Endurance Phase Pace: Easy and Easy to Moderate

Easy occurs about 60-72% of your maximal heart rate (MHR). It is a good recovery pace between faster workout days, and is a “normal” aerobic training pace. When this “talk” pace is held for longer runs, it’s a useful way to rely more on fat for energy. The long runs are about putting in time on the body than pushing intensity. They help you become accustomed to fluid loss and other stresses. Easy pace is where all training begins—and should remain several weeks before introducing faster running or walking. As you get stronger, view easy run pace as a pace you could hold many miles or hours. Focus on light foot turnover and rhythmic breathing. Moderate pace should still feel relatively easy, but as you put more time on the legs, and core temperature increases (sweat more), your breathing is still comfortable, you can still talk, and are not uncomfortable. If breathing becomes too labored or too intense, slow down and take control of the effort. Intermediate and Advanced runners have opportunity for a Fartlek and Tempo sessions (refer to the Workout Key from last month). If you are not ready to try these yet, just do your Foundation Run for the time prescribed and enjoy!

Relay Team Tip: Why Runners Should Cross Train: Overuse injuries can be caused by instability in the joints–hips, knees, and ankles–resulting from poor strength in the stabilizing muscles. Weak muscles on the outside of the hip (hip adductors) can cause the pelvis to tip toward your unsupported side when your foot lands, placing strain on the hip and/or knee joint. Resistance training can help. Tightness can contribute to some injuries. Iliotibial (IT) band friction syndrome is a typical issue for runners. Stretching can loosen tight connective tissue. Replacing one weekly recovery run workout with easy bicycling or pool running can help reduce repetitive impact of the lower extremities without sacrificing fitness. Impact forces are usually the origin of nearly every injury.

Rehabilitation: Cross-training can help get back to exercise quickly and reduce risk of recurrence. About half of running injuries are re-injuries. Eccentric strengthening of the calf is a very effective way to correct Achilles tendinosis, an inability of the calf muscle to absorb force. Non-impact activity can maintain aerobic fitness while running is limited. Olympic silver medalist Meb Keflezighi successfully used this strategy when injuries hampered his lead-up to the 2004 Olympic Trials Marathon. Replacing runs with a few weekly bike workouts enabled him to build fitness to finish second, earning a trip to Athens.

Fitness: Due to impact, the most gifted runners can handle no more than about 15 hours of running per week. Athletes in non-impact sports such as swimming or cycling routinely double this amount. With non-impact cardio, you can gain a little extra fitness without increasing risk.

Power: Resistance training, particularly plyometrics, can increase power, translating to greater stride length, reduce ground contact time, and result in faster times. A Swedish study where runners replaced 32% of running with plyometrics for nine weeks improved sprint speed, economy, and 5K times. The control group who maintained a normal training schedule showed no improvement.

Efficiency: Dynamic flexibility is the ability to run with minimal internal resistance from muscles and joints. Dynamic stretches are movements that enhance flexibility, mimicking the way muscles and connective tissue stretch during running. Regular skipping and giant walking lunges (i.e. walking with ridiculously long steps) are examples and can enhance efficiency of your stride.

Weeks 9-12: Endurance/Strength Phase

If following the 5 Months to 5 Miles plan, the third block begins September 13, 2010. Teams still have time to start the program!

Weeks 9-12 of our training plan are presented below as we continue to build aerobic endurance foundation for all three levels of runners. The runs in this block are still easy, low-effort for the basic plan, targeted for new runners or exercisers. Basic runners can still continue the walk/run routine or jog longer segments. Moderately-low to moderate effort endurance runs are still the cornerstone for Intermediate level runners. Advanced runners now have more challenging efforts included this block.

The endurance phase is the longest and most essential building block for every runner, as it conditions the cardiorespiratory system, muscles and emotions, especially for those getting back into the habit of regular exercise after a layoff. Don’t sabotage your success by trying to run too fast too soon.

If you are just forming your team or joining the relay training program, with 12 weeks of preparation before race date, there’s still plenty of time! Select the level most appropriate for your fitness level, lace up your shoes and get going!

Endurance Pace: Easy to Moderate

Easy occurs about 60-72% of your maximal heart rate (MHR). It is a good recovery pace between faster workouts, and is “normal” aerobic training pace. When this “talk” pace is held for longer runs, it’s a useful way to rely more on fat for energy. The long runs are about putting time on the body than pushing intensity. They help you become accustomed to fluid loss and other stresses. Easy pace is where training begins, and should remain several weeks before introducing faster runs or walks. An easy run pace is what you could hold many miles. Focus on light foot turnover and rhythmic breathing. Moderate pace should still feel easy, but as you put more time on the legs, and you sweat more, breathing is still comfortable, you can still talk, and not uncomfortable. If breathing becomes very labored, slow down and control the effort. Intermediate and Advanced runners have opportunity for a Fartlek and Tempo sessions (refer to the previous Workout Key). If you are not ready for these yet, do Foundation Runs for the time prescribed and enjoy!

Relay Team Tip: Learn to Develop a Sense of Pace

The most important thing any athlete can learn is a sense of running or jogging pace. Controlling pace is the essential key to effective training and conditioning. An easy way to start pace training is on a track or measured course with a digital watch. Set the watch to beep at a specific distance, such as ¼ mile, ½ mile or mile split time. Choose a comfortable pace. As you run, listen for the beep at the split mark you set. You quickly learn to either pick up the pace if the beep comes before you pass your start line, or slow down if it comes after. Pretty soon, you develop a sense of rhythm for that pace, and you’ll hear the beep close to your start point. After time, you can develop different paces “at will”. As you get better at pacing, you’ll relate pace to how you feel, and this is called “perceived exertion,” and you won’t need a watch, markers or possibly a heart rate monitor to regulate pace.

Try out your internal sense, checking against the watch or heart rate monitor to learn how to adjust for hills or terrain. When you learn to run while holding set paces, you are managing your training and fitness. Pace is the key factor in conditioning that controls physical improvement. Running too slow doesn’t stimulate the body enough to get the best improvement, but is necessary when first starting to run to prevent injury. Running too fast requires too much recovery time, and training becomes inefficient.

The most important pace for building endurance is called “tempo” pace. This pace is the fastest you can run without building up lactate in your blood. Threshold pace is great for advanced conditioning. You get in maximum effort without needing extensive recovery time. Everyone’s threshold moves up and down according to training (or lack of it!). Learn to recognize tempo pace and use it as a benchmark, relating it to training or race paces. This is the cornerstone of improvement. If you don’t build up a good lactate load, you didn’t use your full potential. Everybody has a maximum pace they can keep up over the bulk of a race. If you run just a little faster than this pace, it causes the muscles to fatigue, lose power, feel exhausted and your mind says you can’t keep going. This is “red line” pace. Knowing when you are at red line and how far and how long you can go when you’re over it are keys to planning and managing paces.

Tools like lactate measurement and heart rate monitors were once available only to Olympic level athletes. Now every runner can take advantage of professional knowledge and training tools, such as heart rate monitors or technology such as Garmin’s, to develop winning a race or producing personal records. The right paces use full potential through different parts of the race, even if other runners are passing or if you are in front. Developing a sense of pace takes discipline, patience, confidence and experience to hold the correct pace for you, and one that will get you to the finish having run the best race you are capable of in your fitness development. Understand what pace it takes to run a 5k or 5 miles, and how that differs from whatever distance you choose to achieve the conditioning that controls physical improvement to help reach your personal goals.

Weeks 13-16: Strength Phase

Block four begins October 11, 2010. If you are just forming your team or just found the relay training program, 8 weeks of preparation before race date is still plenty of time! Select the level most appropriate for your fitness level, lace up your shoes and get going!

Strength Phase
Weeks 13-16 of our training plan is presented below as we continue to build endurance and strength for all three levels of runners. This 4-week block moves to more moderate effort for basic, new runners/exercises. Basic runners may continue a walk/run pattern, or jog longer duration, shorter walk segments. Intermediate and Advanced level runners incorporate more run specific strength, and begin to sharpen speed skills with challenging efforts.

Endurance is the essential building block for every runner. If you are not ready to step up training with more challenging runs, such as including hills and/or faster paces, don’t sabotage your or your team’s finish by trying to run too hard or too fast if you are not ready and risk injury. Keep running easy to moderate foundation runs in that case.

Paces for Weeks 13-16
Easy
Easy occurs about 60-72% of maximal heart rate (MHR) and is a good recovery pace between faster workouts and “normal” aerobic training pace. You could hold an easy pace many miles. This “talk” pace is for longer runs and relies more on fat for energy. Long runs are here, putting time on the body, not pushing intensity.

Moderate
Moderate is a medium rhythm tempo pace and introduces faster runs (or walks). Focus on light foot turnover and rhythmic breathing. This pace should still feel comfortable during shorter to moderate length runs, but as you put more time on the legs, you begin to sweat more, breathing increases, but you can still talk. Short “Fartlek” segments, easier Tempo runs and a XT session once a week can fall here (refer to Workout Key). If breathing becomes quite labored, slow a bit and control effort. If you are not ready for increased effort yet, keep doing easy Foundation Runs for the time prescribed and enjoy!

Threshold
Threshold pace is moderately-hard faster rhythm, used for Fartleks and Tempo Runs. This is quality training with limited stress and roughly 85%-90% of Max HR. Breathing is labored, but is slower than a fast 5k pace by about 20-30 seconds per mile. “Tempo runs” should feel moderate to moderately hard for basic and intermediate runners. Advanced runners can use a moderately hard to hard effort by holding the fartleks or tempo segments for a longer duration. You can use threshold pace for short hill reps, and for the one to three minute intervals.

Fast
Fast pace: Repetition and Interval Pace is hard, to achieve 95-100% of Max HR for brief periods. Intervals are three to five minutes, and shorter for basic or intermediate runners. This is not all-out sprinting, but very uncomfortable, breathing labored, near red line, legs burning. Intervals faster than this pace introduce fatigue and possible injury; and certainly compromise the next training day. Remember: you’re not running this pace for your relay! You are running 4 to 6 miles. Fast pace running, in limited doses, builds physical and mental strength and power. Racing requires economy and speed, both of which this pace can improve by forcing mechanical aspects to mirror race-day, especially on hills, or in a 5k or the last half mile of a 5 miler. Recover between intervals or reps as directed. Establish a pace so you are able to run the last one the same pace as the first. If not, you started too fast!

Block Four Team Tip: “Act like a champion to be a champion”
A champion isn’t always the individual that’s crosses the finish line first. You’ve been working out for 2-3 months and feeling pretty fit now, right? It’s time to begin testing your physical and mental skills. Do you still have concerns? You might be asking yourself, “Will I have a great run, or will I let my team down”?

Race day can be both exciting and stressful for beginner and experienced athletes alike. Every sport has champions. Running a relay can be very important. It may be the “push” you needed to engage in a fitness program, or learn valuable skills, such as team dynamics, or, may spill into other areas of life. You may have come to the realization that no matter how hard you train, being the champion athlete or relay team that crosses the line first, or runs a Personal or Team Best may elude you this year.

A champion of life is the real winner. Being a champion of life is the ultimate reward and easy… act like a champion. Learning how to achieve mastery over ourselves, our thoughts and emotions is the most difficult part. You don’t need to beat all opponents, or even get the best time! But a champion of life works constantly at being the best they can be just by practicing being mentally sharp, strong, and gracious by helping and encouraging others achieve a personal path to success.

Try out your internal sense, checking against the watch or heart rate monitor to learn how to adjust for hills or terrain. When you learn to run while holding set paces, you are managing your training and fitness. Pace is the key factor in conditioning that controls physical improvement. Running too slow doesn’t stimulate the body enough to get the best improvement, but is necessary when first starting to run to prevent injury. Running too fast requires too much recovery time, and training becomes inefficient.

A champion of life demonstrates four qualities:

  1. Life, like sports, is about creating a positive image, what you’ve achieved, and realizing success by mastering your habits, thoughts and words, which translates to confidence.
  2. Never quit learning.You learn when happiness is created by helping others achieve success. Be a student of life and your sport skills will also improve.
  3. Mental toughness is being able to summon emotional strength at the right time with grace and dignity. We are defined not by the fight, but by how we fought, and what we overcame to get to the start, and cross the finish line. That is a Champions reward.
  4. Champions act! Begin to think and act like the champion you are!

Weeks 17-20: Sharpening & Tapering Phase

Block five begins November 8, 2010. This is your final 4 weeks of preparation before race day!

Sharpening & Tapering Phase
Weeks 17-20 is our final phase of the relay training plan for all three levels of runners. This 4 week block now moves to more moderate to higher intensity effort. Basic runners may continue a walk/jog or run pattern, or steady jog for the 5 mile distance or duration of your segment. Intermediate and Advanced level runners sharpen speed skills with challenging efforts. Endurance is still the essential building block for every runner. If you are not ready for more challenging runs, or faster paces, and risk injury, keep running easy to moderate and have fun!

Paces for Weeks 17-20
Easy

Easy is about 60-72% of maximal heart rate (MHR) and is also a good recovery pace between faster workouts. You could hold this easy pace for many miles. This “talk” pace is for short easy runs, or for longer runs putting time on the body, not pushing intensity.

Moderate
Moderate is a medium tempo pace and introduces steadier runs (or walks). Focus on rhythmic breathing. This pace should still feel comfortable during shorter to moderate length runs, but as you put more time on the legs, you begin to sweat more, breathing increases, but you can still talk. Short”Fartlek” segments, easier Tempo runs and a XT session once a week can fall into moderate pace (refer to Workout Key). If breathing becomes quite labored, slow a bit and control effort. If you are not ready for increased effort, keep doing Foundation Runs for the time prescribed and enjoy!

Threshold
Threshold pace is moderately-hard faster rhythm. It is a pace used for Fartleks and Tempo Runs. This is quality training with limited stress and roughly falls into the 85%-90% of Max HR. Breathing is labored, but slower than a fast 5k pace by about 20-30 seconds per mile. “Tempo runs” should feel moderate to moderately hard for basic and intermediate runners. Advanced runners can use a harder effort by holding fartlek segments or tempos runs for longer duration. Use threshold pace forshort hill reps, and for one to three minute intervals.

Fast
Fast pace: Repetition and Interval Pace is hard, to achieve 95-100% of Max HR for brief periods. Intervals are three to five minutes, and shorter for basic or intermediate runners. This is not all-out sprinting, but very uncomfortable, breathing is labored, legs burning. Remember: you’re not running this pace for your relay! You are running 4 to 6 miles. Fast pace running, in limited doses, builds physical and mental strength and power. Racing requires economy and speed, both of which this pace can improve by forcing mechanical aspects to mirror race-day, especially on hills, or in a 5k or the last half mile of a 5 miler. Recover between intervals or reps as directed.

Block Five Relay Team Tip: “Get Ready for Race Day”

  1. Get Organized: Get enough sleep the night before the race. Pack everything you need the night before. Pin your race number on so you won’t forget it. Make sure the last person on your team has the timing chip. Arrive early and warm up properly—light jogging back and forth along the first 200 yards of the part you will be running. Work out transportation to your designated relay point in advance. There is nothing more disheartening for a relay member to reach the hand off point, unable to find their team mate! If possible, run your segment of the race during a training run so you’ll know what to expect on the course with no surprises.
  2. Don’t Overdress or Underdress: Start your relay segment feeling slightly underdressed. Your body will heat up during the race, and clothing that was comfortable for training may now feel too heavy. If the weather is cool, try layers. You can always remove a hat and gloves and tuck them in your shorts. Wear what you have practiced in training. Race day is not the day to try brand new shoes or clothing you’ve never worn. Buy shoes at least 2 weeks before race day to ensure they are broken in and won’t create hot spots or blisters for the distance you are running. Be prepared for the weather – race day can be freezing or hot and humid. Prepare clothing for any scenario.
  3. Eating: Don’t eat or drink anything your have not tried in training. This is not the time to experiment – training is to see what does and does not work. If you are one of the last 2 or 3 relay team mates, try eating early with plenty of time to digest.
  4. Starting Pace: Avoid sprinting out of the relay box! Starting too fast, you may begin hyperventilating and blow the pace that is right for you or practiced. Begin a bit slower, then build into your race pace and finish strong.
  5. Drink: In warm weather, drink fluids even if it is only a 4-6 mile segment. Get used to taking in fluids during your training runs.
  6. Have fun! Remember to smile as you reach your team mate or as you cross the finish line! Encourage each other and celebrate at the post race party! Begin making plans for next year’s relay team. After the race, eat something healthy as soon as possible. Take it easy for a couple of days with easy running or cross training.